‘Taking to the Streets against the Vietnam War’: A Timeline History of Australian Protest 1962-1972 –– 1965

1965 January – U.S extends the war to Laos and blasts trails used by North Vietnamese to pass supplies and cadres to NLF January – ‘National Service’ registration period begins for youths turning twenty January 1-June 30 January – Australian military personnel numbers in South Vietnam rise to 200 (including 81 ‘advisors’) February 7 –... Continue Reading →

‘Taking to the Streets against the Vietnam War’: A Timeline History of Australian Protest 1962-1972 –– 1964

1964 March – CND march Dandenong to Melbourne against French nuclear tests April 5 – CICD launches national petition against French nuclear tests in Pacific and underground nuclear tests June 6 – Defence Minister Paltridge announces doubling (30 to 60) of Australian military ‘advisors’ in South Vietnam July 6 – Warrant Officer Kevin Conway from... Continue Reading →

‘Taking to the Streets against the Vietnam War’: A Timeline History of Australian Protest 1962-1972 –– 1963

1963 January – External Affairs Minister Barwick announces further consignment of wire and ‘equipment’ for ‘strategic villages’ in South Vietnam March 8 – Jim Cairns denounces ‘military resistance to national-revolutionary movements in economically-retarded countries’ March 26 – CICD launches new nation-wide petition for nuclear-free zone in Southern Hemisphere and against foreign military bases on Australian... Continue Reading →

‘Taking to the Streets against the Vietnam War’: A Timeline History of Australian Protest 1962-1972 –– 1962

1962 March – CND in Melbourne campaigns against atmospheric testing by both superpowers April – ‘Aldermaston Solidarity March’ organised by ANZ Congress for International Cooperation and Disarmament (CICD) May – U.S Secretary of State Dean Rusk visits Australia to demand Australian participation in South Vietnam conflict 24 – Australian Government announces thirty ‘military advisors’ to... Continue Reading →

‘Taking to the Streets against the Vietnam War’: A Timeline History of Australian Protest 1962-1972 –– Introduction

It started as a trickle and became a flood. The first Australians to protest against the Vietnam war in the early sixties could not have imagined their tiny and isolated movement was laying the seeds of what was to eventually become the largest and greatest social movement in the annals of Australian protest. Vietnam was... Continue Reading →

‘Taking to the Streets against the Vietnam War’: A Timeline History of Australian Protest 1962-1972 –– Prologue

1945 August – ‘August Revolution’ in Saigon ousts Japanese September 2 – Ho Chi Minh declares Vietnamese independence French colonial forces re-occupy Vietnam and are resisted by Viet Minh – the first Indo-China war begins   1954 U.S finances cost of French war in Vietnam and uses air force in battle of Dien Bien Phu. ... Continue Reading →

Democratic Opposition to War The 1916-17 anti-conscription campaigns: Impacts and legacies

Conference: 20 May 2017, 9am-4.30pm, Siteworks, 33 Saxon Street, Brunswick 2017 marks the centenary of the defeat of the 1917 conscription plebiscite. During 1917, in the midst of the war, Australian anti-conscription campaigners succeeded in defeating the introduction of conscription for a second time. This was a unique example of popular opposition to conscription in the countries engaged in WW1,... Continue Reading →

History and the Working Class Now: the Collective Impulse, Tumult and Democracy

Terry Irving Terry Irving was invited to address the Sydney Historical Research Network in March 2017, as part of a session on ‘Histories of Class Now’. The other speakers were Hannah Forsyth and Elizabeth Humphrys. Each of them was asked to say something about their current research. A revised version of his address, followed by... Continue Reading →

A SHELF OF REDS by Rowan Cahill and Terry Irving

A selection of some of the books by Australian radical historians that have meant a lot to us as scholars and activists writing and exploring radical history for ten years together, and for much longer separately. The books selected have either never made it into the academic history canon or, if they did, are now neglected. by Rowan... Continue Reading →

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: