ON THE MARGINS

By Rowan Cahill An overview of the work of Iain McIntyre, and a review of his anthology, On the Fly! Hobo Literature and Songs, 1879-1941. Melbourne-based left activist Iain McIntyre is many things, most recently a doctoral graduate with a thesis, and potential book, dealing with environmental direct action between 1979 and 1990 in Australia,... Continue Reading →

VINTAGE RED

by Rowan Cahill There is a vast amount of material, published and otherwise, relating to the history of the Communist Party of Australia/CPA (1920-1991). Examination of the footnotes to Stuart Macintyre’s first volume of the history of the CPA, The Reds (1998), attests to this, as does familiarity with the two resource bibliographies of CPA... Continue Reading →

END OF PARAGRAPH

by Rowan Cahill Back in the 1980s, the autodidact bookseller Bob Gould pressed a book into my hands, as was his way whenever I visited the Aladdin’s Cave rabbit warrens of his Sydney bookshop. “Comrade, you’ve got to read this”, usually his way of recommending the latest or neglected anti-Stalinist publication. This time it was... Continue Reading →

Radical History: Thinking, Writing and Engagement

By Terry Irving and Rowan Cahill   Kicking away the props In recent years, in various places and on our blog “Radical Sydney/Radical History”, we have written about radical history. As radical historians we seek out, explore, and celebrate the diversities of alternatives and oppositions, arguing there is a basic tension between radical history and... Continue Reading →

THANK YOU BILL: William Horace (Bill) Langlois

By Rowan Cahill*   William Horace (Bill) Langlois died in September 2015, aged 92. When I first met him, back in 1970, he was twenty-two years older than me, a time span that now, me writing at the age of 70, seems brief, but in the eyes and mind of the youth that was me... Continue Reading →

MULLEN’S CHOICES

By Rowan Cahill (University of Wollongong) In late November 2014, illness claimed the life of Geoff Mullen, long-time letter writer to the ‘Letters to the Editor’ page of the Sydney Morning Herald. For years the ‘Letters to the Editor’ section of newspapers had been his public forum, and the Herald published his ‘last hurrah’ the... Continue Reading →

A LONG SHADOW

By Rowan Cahill   I never knew my grandfather, the father of my mother. But he was a WWI veteran. Originally a baker by trade in Beechworth (Victoria), by the First World War he was a horse whisperer in the Tumut region of NSW. At the age of 50 in 1915, he went to war... Continue Reading →

Rupert Lockwood on Wilfred Burchett

Introduction By Phillip Deery The controversies surrounding the life, reputation and legacy of the famous Australian reporter and journalist, Wilfred Burchett, would be well known to many readers. One central allegation, on which much ink has been split, is that he was an ‘agent of influence’ for the KGB. This claim was first raised in... Continue Reading →

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